Selected articles and online-only features from the Church of the Brethren’s official magazine

April 8, 2020

Puzzles: Brethren Camps

Crossword puzzle

How well do you know Church of the Brethren camps?

This puzzle can be printed or completed online: place your cursor in a square and simply start typing. Use the scroll bars to see the clues, or click a square and the clue will be highlighted.

You may need help with these clues. Click this link for a list of Church of the Brethren camps However, the puzzle includes some former camps also!

Want to work with a friend? Visit the Outdoor Ministries Facebook and see who can help you!

Printable Brethren camps crossword (PDF)


Find more camps below!

Instead of providing a list of the names hidden here, see the clues beneath the puzzle.

Printable camp word search (PDF)

Camp word search clues

This camp was purchased in 1949 and developed using surplus army barracks and the Seneca congregation meetinghouse.

From 1944 to 1952, this camp was held at the Barbour Co. 4-H camp site until the district voted to have a campsite of its own.

This camp was established by the N. Illinois and Wisconsin districts in 1946. Clarence Fike headed the committee that directed the camp’s development.

This camp in southern Ohio replaced Camp Sugar Grove.

This Tennessee camp was purchased after Joe A. Wine, a Bridgewater College student, raised money for a year to begin the camp.

This camp was purchased by the NE. Kansas district in 1946. During a 1948 peace education institute held by Dan West, the campers built this camp’s dining hall fireplace.

The property of this camp, which serves the 55 congregations of the Middle Pennsylvania district, was bought in 1964, but camping did not begin on site until 1966.

This camp is about an hour and a half west of Washington, D.C. and it has been affiliated with the Mid-Atlantic district of the Church of the Brethren.

This camp was named after a famous river in Schwarzenau, Germany.

During its beginning years from 1934 to 1952, this camp had been held in various meetinghouses and barns. It was originally named Camp Carolina until it was renamed in 1961.

This camp along the shores of Jehnsen Lake was managed by Russel Hartzler who also helped choose the location of the camp.

This camp had its beginnings in several locations. The S. Missouri and Arkansas districts finally bought a property in West Plains, Missouri.

This camp was founded in 1924 by Edgar Rothrock. This camp was one of the first camps to be developed.

This camp was established in 1946 by the N. California district. This camp was led by people like Paul Studebaker, Russell Burris, and Glen Harmon.